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Sleeve. Success?

hannahp
on 5/23/13 6:58 am - MS

Hi all,

I posted a while back about wanting to get started in this life-changing, LONG, process of WLS. Ha. Well, I went for my first appointment yesterday, also had my psych eval. I'm pretty much on my way now to receiving a date and I couldn't be more nervous or EXCITED.

After going to the first seminar I was set on doing gastric bypass. I thought, "if I'm going to do it, I might as well go all out." I felt this would be best and have the best results, fastest results, and keep me from cheating.

I don't snack and I'm not a sweets eater. But, I am from the South and I love me some comfort food. Like, fried chicken and potatoes, and Japanese food like fried rice and chicken. Yum.

Anyway, yesterday, after talking to the doctor he thinks the sleeve is the best option for me. First, because of my age (25) and my BMI (around 47). I was a little discouraged but of course I trust the doctor and his opinion very much.

So, I was wondering: could some of you who have had the sleeve give me a little insight? I need some success stories! How long did it take you loose weight? I know on the gastric bypass you come out on the average weighting 20-40 pounds less. This does not happen with the sleeve, right? Has anyone who got the sleeve regretted it and wished the would have gotten the full bypass?

 

WannaWeighLess
on 5/23/13 7:08 am - PA

Hi Hannahp,

I'm pre-op too and am seriously considering the sleeve. Did your surgeon mention why your age and BMI would be best suited by a sleeve? I'm a little older than you, 31 and a little heavier with a BMI of 48 but really curious about all this. Congrats on getting started and best wishes!

hannahp
on 5/23/13 7:17 am - MS

My age mostly because I do not have many health problems YET. I am def on the road to being diabetic if something does not change but for the most part (besides feeling GROSS) I am pretty healthy. That is one of the reasons he suggested the sleeve. He said because this is more of a preventative thing that is what he is really hoping I will go with. I also think the meant with mentioning my BMI is because I don't have as much as say someone with a 60 BMI does. I have to go to yet ANOTHER class next week and meet with a dietician and nurse practitioner and I'm sure a lot of more my questions will be answered then.

WannaWeighLess
on 5/23/13 7:32 am - PA

That's great! Glad you're healthy and working toward keeping it that way. That's pretty much where I am as well. I'm thinking that the restriction alone should be enough to help you reach your goals. Add in some physical activity and you'll be there in no time. I can't wait to start my classes. It would be a good idea to write down your questions as they arise to make sure you get all the answers you need.

bubbylucy
on 5/23/13 8:31 am - Raleigh, NC

I think the younger patients get the sleeve recommended because of the longterm vitamin deficiencies that could happen with the RNY. This is not a risk with the lseeve as vitamins are mainly absorbed in the small intestines bypassed with the RNY

 

Audra

  

Melody2
on 5/23/13 9:31 am
VSG on 04/10/13

I had surgery on April 10 and I'm down 30 pounds.  Others who had the surgery have lost more in the same amount of time, but I'm happy with the results.  I didn't have any problems after surgery except for an incision that was slow healing.  I felt very tired the first four weeks but doing much better now.

The sleeve helps to manage "quantity" vs. "quality."  You can still gain weight or fail to lose weight if you eat "slider" foods (i.e., foods that slide right through the sleeve with very little nutritional value....chips, crackers, french fries, candy, etc.).  Eating healthy makes the sleeve work. 

SarahI
on 5/23/13 10:15 am - Indian River, MI
VSG on 03/04/13 with

I was sleeved on March 4th  and as of today i have lost 57 pounds.  I thought the same as you and i was worried that i wouldn't get the results like i thought i would with a RNY or DS..  But i follow what my doctor says is right for me, and i am happy with my decision to go with the sleeve.  Do your research and keep asking questions.  

    

SARAH

MichelleLarra
on 5/23/13 10:45 am - NY

I had the sleeve on April 17th and during my first post op appointment which was May 6th I had lost 34lbs.  I know I've lost more since then because my clothes are very big on me and I notice the changes to my face, etc.  I'm sure you will be successful with the sleeve.  My surgeon used to only perform gastric bypass until about 7 years ago when he changed to the sleeve and has a vast amount of patients who have been just as successful.  

MsBatt
on 5/23/13 12:33 pm

You should also research the Duodenal Switch. The DS has the same stomach as the Sleeve, plus an intestinal bypass similar to, but more effective than, that of the RNY/gastric bypass. It causes permanent malabsorption of a significant per centage of the calories you at, especially the calories from FAT. (I'm a Southern girl too, and I fry everything in bacon grease. *grin*)

Here's the thing. Most people can lose a significant amount of weight with any form of WLS. The trick isn't losing the weight, it's keeping it off, and that's where that permanent malabsorption comes into play. I'm 9.5 years post-op, and I can eat a LOT. Thanks to my DS, that food isn't sticking around on my hips. I'm pretty effortlessly maintaining a loss of 170 pounds, and eating pretty good, too---things like bacon and fried chicken and 'taters.

MsBatt
on 5/23/13 12:35 pm

I know on the gastric bypass you come out on the average weighting 20-40 pounds less.

Do you mean come out of the HOSPITAL? Oh, no no no---most people come home weighing MORE than when they went in, due to all the fluids they pump into you.