Is Aspercreme an NSAID???

goingdown0708
on 7/29/09 3:46 pm - Southborough, MA
RNY on 07/13/09 with
Is Aspercreme considered an NSAID? I have some right shoulder pain since getting out of the hospital that is definitely muscular and looking for some relief.
  
ddwscw
on 7/29/09 3:50 pm - Modesto, CA
Are you swallowing it? haha. Nsaids cause ulcers that is why we can't have them. If it is not ingested, then it can't affect the stomach lining. But, you check the ingredient list and see if it has anything.

Includes 25 lbs. pre-op loss.



By Jazelle

By Jazelle
H.a.l.a. B.
on 7/29/09 3:54 pm
RNY on 05/14/08 with
Even if we do not swallow things - they do affect us and the lining. Sorry. That is why the patches and the creams are no-no.

H.a.l.a RNY 5/14/2008    

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ddwscw
on 7/29/09 3:59 pm - Modesto, CA
Huh, good to know this. It is the first time I have heard it. I was told different. BUT, I would rather be safe than sorry, so I will remember these no-nos. Thanks. But, back to the original poster... I always find a heating pad works best for soreness. I have one I can use with a damp towel and the moist heat does wonders.

Includes 25 lbs. pre-op loss.



By Jazelle

By Jazelle
(deactivated member)
on 7/29/09 6:05 pm
Here is a full answer.

"Prostaglandins are natural chemicals that serve as messengers to promote inflammation. By inhibiting the body's production of prostaglandins, NSAIDs decrease inflammation. However, certain prostaglandins also are important in protecting the stomach lining from the corrosive effects of stomach acid as well as playing a role in maintaining the natural, healthy condition of the stomach lining.

These protective prostaglandins are produced by an enzyme called Cox-1. By blocking the Cox-1 enzyme and disrupting the production of prostaglandins in the stomach, NSAIDs can cause ulcers and bleeding. Some NSAIDs have less effect prostaglandins in the stomach than others, and, therefore, have a lower risk of causing ulcers.

While contact with the stomach (by taking NSAIDs orally) can make things worse, NSAIDs can have this effect no matter how they are administered; by IV, by patch, by nasal spray, etc."

FastFingers ~*~
on 7/29/09 9:06 pm
While this is a common misperception, DDWSCW, it is absolutely not true!

http://www.medicinenet.com/nonsteroidal_anti-inflammatory_dr ugs_and_ulcers/article.htm

 

How do NSAIDs work and how do they cause stomach problems?

Prostaglandins are natural chemicals that serve as messengers to promote inflammation. By inhibiting the body's production of prostaglandins, NSAIDs decrease inflammation. However, certain prostaglandins also are important in protecting the stomach lining from the corrosive effects of stomach acid as well as playing a role in maintaining the natural, healthy condition of the stomach lining. These protective prostaglandins are produced by an enzyme called Cox-1.

By blocking the Cox-1 enzyme and disrupting the production of prostaglandins in the stomach, NSAIDs can cause ulcers and bleeding. Some NSAIDs have less effect prostaglandins in the stomach than others, and, therefore, have a lower risk of causing ulcers.  The means of administration of NSAIDs is irrelevant, as the resulting inhibition of prostaglandins occurs systemically once the medication is absorbed.  So taking a shot, wearing a patch, applying a topical preparation, or inhaling a nasal spray will also have the same effect.

                                   Flying Spagetti Monster

"Doubt everything.  Find your own light."
--
Last words of Gautama Buddha, in Theravada tradition

Jupiter6
on 7/29/09 3:51 pm - Near Media, Pa- South of Philly, NJ
It's trolamine salicylate, I think-- which is similar to aspirin. I wouldn't go there.

 "Oh sweet and sour Jesus, that is GOOD!" - Stephen Colbert  Lap RNY 7/07-- Lap Gallbladder 5/08--  
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ejjy
on 7/29/09 6:32 pm - Watertown, MA
tylenol is your safest bet.  definitely not an NSAID.  take as directly or put your liver in peril though.

wondering if the shoulder pain is gas -related, mine was in my left shoulder.  keep on walking!

RNY 6/16/09 - Last weighed 10/27/2011 weighed 151 lost 52 pounds  66% toward personal goal  of 125, six pounds from unofficial unpretentious goal of 145lbs......basically very happy.   boo-rah, RNY!

foobear
on 7/29/09 8:29 pm - Medford, MA
Aspercreme contains a topical salicylate, trolamine salicylate, making it a NSAID of sorts.

Here's an article from www.sportsinjurybulletin.com; it doesn't address post-RNY users, of course.  It's likely that the blood levels of salicylate are much lower than those seen after taking aspirin or sodium salicylate orally.  Does this make it safe for RNYers?  I have no idea.

/Steve

Trolamine salicylate: The ‘Deep-Heat’ debate

Trolamine salicylate is the key ingredient to most creams that claim when applied directly to the skin can cure muscular aches and pains. Until recently however, the validity of trolamine salicylate as a sound tool for curing muscle-pain has been highly contested.

The First Test

Just over ten years ago, researchers at a Veterinarians Medical Center in Philadelphia applied trolamine salicylate skin cream on to the knees of both dogs and humans. The canines with trolamine rubbed into their knees had 20 times as much salicylate in the underlying muscles; compared to those who were taking aspirin orally (salicylate is the active ingredient in aspirin).

The research documented one very important fact: even though pill-popping pooches had higher BLOOD levels of salicylate, animals using skin cream had much more of the drug in their tendons, ligaments, cartilage, and joint cavities, where it really mattered, and where the chemical could actually relieve pain and inflammation.

In the Philadelphia research, results with humans were similar, with ample amount of salicylate building up in joint cavities. Actual pain relief was just as good with the salicylate skin cream, compared to ingesting aspirin orally. Plus, the researchers noted one special cream advantage: the ointment rapidly penetrated the skin and then lingered in the underlying muscles and connective tissues for long periods of time, only slowly drifting into the blood stream to be carried away. Overall, the skin cream removed discomfort with none of the side effects or the oral medicine.

The Second Findings

In a more recent test of trolamine salicylate, packaged in a commercial product called Aspercreme, scientists at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami asked 22 males and 12 females to perform three sets of 20 repetitions of biceps curls each day for five consecutive days in order to induce significant muscle soreness. Four times each day, the study subjects rubbed one-half ounce of cream onto the skin directly over the biceps muscles. Half of the subjects rubbed in Aspercreme, the other half employed a placebo cream. Unaware of which cream they were actually using, subjects rated biceps soreness on a O to 10 scale several times a day.

As it turned out, the Aspercreme provided three main benefits:

   1. Muscle soreness appeared within 12 hours after initial exercise for the placebo users but took 24 hours to appear for Aspercreme appliers.
   2. The amount of pain experienced was significantly lower for Aspercreme users.
   3. Pain persisted for one day less with Aspercreme.

Concluding the trolamine debate

Analgesic creams containing 10 per cent trolamine salicylate really do work. There's also the intriguing possibility that a bit of skin cream rubbed on one of your body's 'hot spots' BEFORE a workout may actually reduce the amount of inflammation and pain which may be experienced after the session is over.
DEBI R.
on 7/30/09 1:56 am - CORSICANA, TX
I would have never thought to ask this question.  I've had neck problems for years and I use Ben-Gay all the time and I never thought about it being a NSAIDS. Debi

       



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goingdown0708
on 7/30/09 4:46 am - Southborough, MA
RNY on 07/13/09 with
Thank you  all for your thorough replies. I knew I would get my answer here.
  
ladybugnessa
on 7/30/09 5:00 am - Owings Mills, MD
Wow I never would have thought that you couldn't use topicals!  Thanks guys!
Nessa
Ticker is from Day of Surgery.. weight goal is personal preference as I've MET my doctor's goal

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