Revision Surgery - Dr. Chua

nikki050
on 3/14/12 8:21 am - Milwaukee, WI
 I haven't been on Obesityhelp.com in quite some time!

Hello Friends!!

I'm meeting with my suregeon on Monday to discuss a possible revision surgery. I had Gastric Bypass in April of 2009. I lost a grand total of 183pds but I've gained back 80 of those pounds. I've tried very hard to get this weight off but have not been able to. 

For anyone that has gone through revision surgery, do you have to start from scratch again? (Going through the whole process again?) 

Has anyone had revision surgery through Dr. Chua in Milwaukee, Wisconsin? If so, what can I expect?

Thanks,

Nikki
nikki050
on 3/14/12 8:24 am - Milwaukee, WI
 I forgot to mention that I've had 3 endoscopy sclerotherapy procedures, as well. No luck :(
LindaScrip
on 3/14/12 9:33 am
sorry am slightly confused you said revision surgery what type of surgery are you having done? I feel like I am in the same position as you .
nikki050
on 3/14/12 10:32 am - Milwaukee, WI
 I am not scheduled for a revision yet but I am hoping to have a revision surgery done.
calhelge
on 3/14/12 11:13 pm - West Salem, WI
Hi Nikki,  My name is Callie and I live in La Crosse and a I had a Lap Band and then had it removed because it was making me very sick, I am now in the process of getting Bypass done.  I see the doctor next week and will find out more during that visit.  But, what I was told that according to my insurance company (BCBS) all I have to do 3 months of dietitian appointments and then I should be good to go.  Like I said, it  might be different because of my cir****tances but its worth looking into.
Good Luck,

~Callie
 

        
Davo
on 3/15/12 2:56 am - WI
RNY on 03/12/12 with
 I just got done with my rny at Froedert.  I asked the surgeon the nutritionist and the psychologist why they see failures and do they do or recommend revisions. The one common answer i got was what have you done since your last surgery that makes you believe another one will work.  Before anyone proceeds with a revision that question has to be answered and the problem addressed.  if you gained weight because you broke the rules getting another surgery will not make you follow the rules.  It will make you malabsorbtive for a time but that too will lose its effectiveness and if you are eating improperly which is the cause of most revisions, it is again a temporary fix.  Not passing judgement just suggesting you try and find the cause first and correct that.
H.A.L.A B.
on 3/15/12 3:37 am
I do wi**** was that simple....
In a way it is ... but in a way - it is not...

New Data on Weight Gain Following Bariatric Surgery

Gastric bypass surgery has long been considered the gold standard for weight loss. However, recent studies have revealed that this particular operation can lead to potential weight gain years later. Lenox Hill Hospital’s Chief of Bariatric Surgery, Mitchell Roslin, MD, was the principal investigator of the Restore Trial – a national ten center study investigating whether an endoscopic suturing procedure to reduce the size of the opening between the gastric pouch of the bypass and the intestine could be used to control weight gain in patients following gastric bypass surgery. The concept for the trial originated when Dr. Roslin noticed a pattern of weight gain with a significant number of his patients, years following gastric bypass surgery. While many patients could still eat less than before the surgery and become full faster, they would rapidly become hungry and feel light headed, especially after consuming simple carbohydrates, which stimulate insulin production.

The results of the Restore Trial, which were published in January 2011, did not confirm the original hypothesis – there was no statistical advantage for those treated with suturing. However, they revealed something even more important. The data gathered during the trial and the subsequent glucose tolerance testing verified that patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery and regained weight were highly likely to have reactive hypoglycemia, a condition in which blood glucose drops below the normal level, one to two hours after ingesting a meal high in carbs. Dr. Roslin and his colleagues theorized that the rapid rise in blood sugar – followed by a swift exaggerated plunge – was caused by the absence of the pyloric valve, a heavy ring of muscle that regulates the rate at which food is released from the stomach into the small intestine. The removal of the pyloric valve during gastric bypass surgery causes changes in glucose regulation that lead to inter-meal hunger, impulse-snacking, and consequent weight regain.

Dr. Roslin and his team decided to investigate whether two other bariatric procedures that preserve the pyloric valve – sleeve gastrectomy and duodenal switch – would lead to better glucose regulation, thus suppressing weight regain. The preliminary data of this current study shows that all three operations initially reduce fasting insulin and glucose. However, when sugar and simple carbs are consumed, gastric bypass patients have a 20-fold increase in insulin production at six months, compared to a 4-fold increase in patients who have undergone either a sleeve gastrectomy or a duodenal switch procedure. The dramatic rise in insulin in gastric bypass patients causes a rapid drop in glucose, promoting hunger and leading to increased food consumption.

“Based on these results, I believe that bariatric procedures that preserve the pyloric valve lead to better physiologic glucose regulation and ultimately more successful long-term maintenance of weight-loss," said Dr. Roslin.

http://www.lenoxhillhospital.org/press_releases.aspx?id=2106



Hala. RNY 5/14/2008; Happy At Goal =HAG

"I can eat or do anything I want to - as long as I am willing to deal with the consequences"

"Failure is not falling down, It is not getting up once you fell... So pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again...."

shelleylynn
on 3/20/12 5:38 am - Elizabeth, PA
 Thank you for this article.  I think it explains why 5 years post op I feel the need to eat a sleeve of saltines.  Not salted,....but still :)  I will actually crave them and have gained 20 pounds.  I believe the low glycemic diet might work to set me back to normal.   I have been wondering how in the world when all I eat is saltines, I gain weight.  I have to fix my diet again. 
(deactivated member)
on 3/20/12 8:57 am - Mexico
On March 15, 2012 at 10:37 AM Pacific Time, H. B. wrote:
I do wi**** was that simple....
In a way it is ... but in a way - it is not...

New Data on Weight Gain Following Bariatric Surgery

Gastric bypass surgery has long been considered the gold standard for weight loss. However, recent studies have revealed that this particular operation can lead to potential weight gain years later. Lenox Hill Hospital’s Chief of Bariatric Surgery, Mitchell Roslin, MD, was the principal investigator of the Restore Trial – a national ten center study investigating whether an endoscopic suturing procedure to reduce the size of the opening between the gastric pouch of the bypass and the intestine could be used to control weight gain in patients following gastric bypass surgery. The concept for the trial originated when Dr. Roslin noticed a pattern of weight gain with a significant number of his patients, years following gastric bypass surgery. While many patients could still eat less than before the surgery and become full faster, they would rapidly become hungry and feel light headed, especially after consuming simple carbohydrates, which stimulate insulin production.

The results of the Restore Trial, which were published in January 2011, did not confirm the original hypothesis – there was no statistical advantage for those treated with suturing. However, they revealed something even more important. The data gathered during the trial and the subsequent glucose tolerance testing verified that patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery and regained weight were highly likely to have reactive hypoglycemia, a condition in which blood glucose drops below the normal level, one to two hours after ingesting a meal high in carbs. Dr. Roslin and his colleagues theorized that the rapid rise in blood sugar – followed by a swift exaggerated plunge – was caused by the absence of the pyloric valve, a heavy ring of muscle that regulates the rate at which food is released from the stomach into the small intestine. The removal of the pyloric valve during gastric bypass surgery causes changes in glucose regulation that lead to inter-meal hunger, impulse-snacking, and consequent weight regain.

Dr. Roslin and his team decided to investigate whether two other bariatric procedures that preserve the pyloric valve – sleeve gastrectomy and duodenal switch – would lead to better glucose regulation, thus suppressing weight regain. The preliminary data of this current study shows that all three operations initially reduce fasting insulin and glucose. However, when sugar and simple carbs are consumed, gastric bypass patients have a 20-fold increase in insulin production at six months, compared to a 4-fold increase in patients who have undergone either a sleeve gastrectomy or a duodenal switch procedure. The dramatic rise in insulin in gastric bypass patients causes a rapid drop in glucose, promoting hunger and leading to increased food consumption.

“Based on these results, I believe that bariatric procedures that preserve the pyloric valve lead to better physiologic glucose regulation and ultimately more successful long-term maintenance of weight-loss," said Dr. Roslin.

http://www.lenoxhillhospital.org/press_releases.aspx?id=2106



 
Wow, interesting!  Thank you for posting this.  I just copied and pasted on a F/B page designed for failed bands.  Most are revising to sleeves but a few think dumping is a good and necessary thing and they are revising to bypass for this reason.
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