It's A Win~Win. Think Outside the Box. Good Karma

HeLLeNa_HaNdBaSk
Et

on 4/17/19 9:45 am - Youngstown, OH

Apr 16, 2019

I originally posted this in my BLOG here yesterday.

A week & a half ago, after going through an extensive orientation of rules, regulations, the process, given a physical onsite by an RN, how to etc., etc., etc. Roughly 4 hours (that alone was exhausting), last week I began donating plasma two times a week with 2-3 days between each MONETARILY compensated visit via their debit Mastercard. Anyway, it all took so long, and i had an appointment to have my taxes prepared & filed elec. for FREE at the business college at Youngstown State Univ.

But before I did all of that, I personally wanted the GREENLIGHT to do this Plasma donation for those in need from my PCP (she prescribes/ omits/ tracks) my meds & from my surgeon's office/ bariatric nurse. They said "Yes"! But in the end, my local plasma donation clinic (in Youngstown, OH) give the final yea or nea for accepting you as a client.

Always Google and do your research. Contact your local site and ask in depth questions, not just how much $$ you're compensated on to a debit card. Btw, I won't disclose mine, so don't ask. Something like that varies per site & region. AND you're NOT permitted to donate at more than one center. There are strict national laws & health codes against it. If you try it, you can & WILL be blacklisted statewide if not nationally. No joke.

My first 'draw' (from my right arm. The 2nd visit 3 days after was my left arm) took place last week and was a long 2 hours & 17 minutes! Oh my GOSH! Plasma is separated from the red blood cells, a saline solution is transferred into your body (my body temp DROPPED & chilled me big time!).Honest to god I felt like I had to use "the Loo" to go number TWO, not number one. LOL! But I didn't. Felt like forever until they began putting my blood back. I felt a little blah & weak, but I was alright. My phlebotomist/ RN assured me that each visit gets easier & takes less time because the body has become acclimated. It true, because my second visit took exactly 62 minutes! I'll be going again Wednesday April 17th morning @ 5:50AM. By the time I arrive around 6:30am, when they open, it's not crowded/ busy, but it takes 45-60mins before they get you into a 'bed' to donate due to a series of checks you must go through EVERY VISIT. It's required.

If you should ever choose to do this, be fully hydrated on water, propel, gatorade, juice/ crystal light/ similar and a high proteins regimen diet in your system. But as post-op WLS patients we are already used to that. Booyahhh!

Absolutely NO COFFEE/ CAFFEINE/ HIGHLY CAFFEINATED TEAS/ Wine/ Alcoholic bevs or too much dairy the day of donation.

They're NOT WILD ABOUT SMOKERS / vaping/ hukahs, etc. NO recent piercings, brandings or ink done regardless of where it is on you body. I think old tats are ok, but a nurse onsite WILL look you over COMPLETELY.

ABSOLUTELY NO drug users or dope.

*Weight minimum is 115LBs; Max weight is 399LBS* depends on a lot of factors in your health at the moment when you wish to do this AND YOUR REGIONAL plasma center's standards. So DO CONTACT THEM 1ST. Just because I'm able, doesn't guarantee you'll be permitted.

*Roughly 6-8 hours AFTER you've donated, you must always, at least 4-5 times a day until the next visit, alternate between HOT & COLD COMPRESSES, at 20 minutes EACH, on the area of your arm where the needle had been. Also clean the area, the next day with warm soapy water & rinse, but don't rub harshly. Also dab the area with peroxide and witch hazel. The point is to keeping the areas on your arms from becoming pinkish or red and bruised. If the RNs/ phlebotomists see the faintest bit of flushing or bruising on one arm, they'll use the other. If both arm bends are bruised, you'll be sent home to take care of the matter. So nip it in the bud immediately. Check your arm bends in the direct light of a bright flashlight if necessary to save yourself the disappointment and a foul attitude. LOL! **Also, NO exercise for two (2) days after donation.

Again, do your research and ask questions of your nearest facility and take notes. They are supposed to & can give you the 411 not patients like myself. My purpose is to point out my EXPERIENCES in this journey as poor yet employed post-op RNY patient that thinks outside the box, and wtd to shine a light on a LEGIT $$ earning opportunity that plays a vital part in saving/ prolonging lives. You won't get rich. You're not supposed to. But you can put it towards bariatric vitamins, supplements, otc meds, gym or therapy memberships, copays, excess skin removal savings, workout gear, newer wardrobe, new hairdo or haircut/ barbering for the new & improved you. Hell, put it towards bills. Anything you want, its your money. It's also good karma.

That's what makes it a WIN-WIN. Also, ask a friend if they might be willing to do donation as well. I have a friend that tried it a cpl years before I did, but she became really ill after attempting it once or twice. I asked her if she followed the protocols BEFORE her donate day, no coffee- no wine- no ciggies- drink lots of water. She said "Probably not." It's not for everyone. Just like with our WLS odyssey, you have to build up that self discipline & think of the downsides of what you'll lose out on if you don't. Bon chance, kids.

Cheers.

Sparklekitty, Science-Loving Derby Hag
on 4/17/19 1:21 pm
RNY on 07/30/19

It's important to be aware that there are some long-term health risks to regular plasma donation, including immune system problems. Occasional donations should be fine, but it's not a great idea to do it frequently. (Source)

I'd also be concerned about the long-term effects of donating blood products as a WLS patient, as we tend to have iron issues. While platelets or plasma may be "safer" than whole blood, it's probably a good idea to track trends in your ferritin levels.

One should also be aware of how plasma-donation companies tend to exploit folks in need of money. Two good reads:

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2018/03/plasma- donations/555599/

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/05/blood-mon ey-the-twisted-business-of-donating-plasma/362012/

Nerdy Little Secret (#42) - Derby Strong!


HW 300 / LW 150 / Post-regain goal: 170

Citizen Kim
on 4/17/19 1:38 pm - Castle Rock, CO

So much better than the reply I wanted to make which was as follows:

Nooooooooooooooooooooo

Proud Feminist, Atheist, LGBT friend, and Democratic Socialist

HeLLeNa_HaNdBaSk
Et

on 4/17/19 1:39 pm - Youngstown, OH

I'm fully aware, and yes there are some shady companies out there. But folks should educate themselves on matters like this and others. To know the pros, com's & risks. I only started a little over a week ago, but started 'doing my homework' on this & consulting med professionals I know and whom were referred to me so I could pick their brain, a year and a half ago (after my friend went). Im naturally curious but cautious and want to know what's what. I suggest others do likewise as well.

Gwen M.
on 4/17/19 2:14 pm
VSG on 03/13/14

It's a pretty disgusting business scheme. I always advise people who want to actually donate plasma to do so through their local Red Cross.

VSG with Dr. Salameh - 3/13/2014
Diagnosed with Binge Eating Disorder and started Vyvanse - 7/22/2016
Reconstructive Surgeries with Dr. Michaels - 6/5/2017 (LBL & brachioplasty), 8/14/2017 (UBL & mastopexy), 11/6/2017 (medial leg lift)

Age 42 Height 5'4" HW 319 (1/3/2014) SW 293 (3/13/2014) CW 149 (7/16/2017)
Next Goal 145 - normal BMI | Total Weight Lost 170

TrendWeight | Food Blog (sort of functional) | Journal (down for maintenance)

Gwen M.
on 4/17/19 2:21 pm
VSG on 03/13/14

From the second article you link, this seems particularly worrisome for a post-WLS person:

Why do donors, including myself, suffer fatigue akin to blackouts? During plasmapheresis, centers often use a chemical, sodium citrate, to keep blood from clotting, Washington explains.

"Sodium citrate and other citric-acid derivatives bond with the calcium in your blood, and afterwards the calcium is no longer available to your body. We know that some people respond badly to sodium citrate. The worst case is rare: extreme hypocalcaemia, which can be fatal. But more often, people will suffer fainting, tingling and numbness, muscle contractions, or even seizures. Walking around with depleted calcium can be extremely dangerous. It can lead to serious healthcare issues."

VSG with Dr. Salameh - 3/13/2014
Diagnosed with Binge Eating Disorder and started Vyvanse - 7/22/2016
Reconstructive Surgeries with Dr. Michaels - 6/5/2017 (LBL & brachioplasty), 8/14/2017 (UBL & mastopexy), 11/6/2017 (medial leg lift)

Age 42 Height 5'4" HW 319 (1/3/2014) SW 293 (3/13/2014) CW 149 (7/16/2017)
Next Goal 145 - normal BMI | Total Weight Lost 170

TrendWeight | Food Blog (sort of functional) | Journal (down for maintenance)

Sparklekitty, Science-Loving Derby Hag
on 4/17/19 2:25 pm
RNY on 07/30/19

Thanks for pointing this out! They use this for platelet donations at the Red Cross as well, and my surgeon suggested I stop donating platelets because of the risk to calcium levels, and eventual osteoporosis risk.

Nerdy Little Secret (#42) - Derby Strong!


HW 300 / LW 150 / Post-regain goal: 170

Gwen M.
on 4/17/19 2:27 pm
VSG on 03/13/14

That makes complete sense. I'm sadly unable to donate at all, due to living in Mad Cow Land at the wrong time - but the one time I tried to donate plasma at my local Red Cross when I was a kid, I almost passed out and had to stop.

VSG with Dr. Salameh - 3/13/2014
Diagnosed with Binge Eating Disorder and started Vyvanse - 7/22/2016
Reconstructive Surgeries with Dr. Michaels - 6/5/2017 (LBL & brachioplasty), 8/14/2017 (UBL & mastopexy), 11/6/2017 (medial leg lift)

Age 42 Height 5'4" HW 319 (1/3/2014) SW 293 (3/13/2014) CW 149 (7/16/2017)
Next Goal 145 - normal BMI | Total Weight Lost 170

TrendWeight | Food Blog (sort of functional) | Journal (down for maintenance)

Gwen M.
on 4/17/19 2:00 pm
VSG on 03/13/14

Hm. I think you're talking about selling plasma, not donating it.

VSG with Dr. Salameh - 3/13/2014
Diagnosed with Binge Eating Disorder and started Vyvanse - 7/22/2016
Reconstructive Surgeries with Dr. Michaels - 6/5/2017 (LBL & brachioplasty), 8/14/2017 (UBL & mastopexy), 11/6/2017 (medial leg lift)

Age 42 Height 5'4" HW 319 (1/3/2014) SW 293 (3/13/2014) CW 149 (7/16/2017)
Next Goal 145 - normal BMI | Total Weight Lost 170

TrendWeight | Food Blog (sort of functional) | Journal (down for maintenance)

Sparklekitty, Science-Loving Derby Hag
on 4/17/19 2:11 pm
RNY on 07/30/19

Excellent clarification.

Nerdy Little Secret (#42) - Derby Strong!


HW 300 / LW 150 / Post-regain goal: 170

Most Active
Recent Topics
×