4 mos out and nutritionist is telling me to slow down and eat more calories

Alexpope
on 2/10/21 11:06 am
RNY on 10/21/20

I just hit my fourth post op month and all I can say is wow. So many things have changed since surgery all for the good. Especially the fact I am now down 100bs. But the girl who handles nutrition at my program told me I am losing too much too quickly and told me to increase my calories and I am just not comfortable with that. I have much more to lose and I really think her advice is a bit off considering that I will hit a point where I won't lose anymore. Does anyone else see an issue with her advice to increase calories?

Citizen Kim
on 2/10/21 2:25 pm - Castle Rock, CO

There is ZERO merit to losing weight slowly. The purpose of this surgery is to lose all your excess weight and learn good habits to keep it off in the long term. There is no standard or rule for how long it must take you, but most veterans would advise you to lose as much as possible before you leave the honeymoon period.

I lost 120lbs in under 6 months to reach below my goal weight.

17 years on, I'm considered successful for keeping most of that off and addressing regains when they happen.

Proud Feminist, Atheist, LGBT friend, and Democratic Socialist

Alexpope
on 2/10/21 3:29 pm
RNY on 10/21/20

Yes! Thank you! I did not feel like this is reasonable advice for a weight loss surgery patient who has a lot of excess weight to lose. I did a lot of reading on this site before posting and saw where you and a number of others suggested to new people that they needed to work on losing and getting to maintenance in the expected time frame I think some called it the honeymoon. I also think that getting below the goal weight is a good idea since again, I read that there is "bounce" I want to be successful with this but now I feel like I may need to pull back going to see her as often. Maybe I can do this without seeing her every two months. I also got an email from her today stating that they are going to schedule labs for me and that if I have any deficiencies I will need to increase those with more nutritional food options. Isn't that what my vitamins are for?

By the way congrats on your long term success. You seem to have done so very well. May I ask when you had your first regain experience?

Citizen Kim
on 2/10/21 5:33 pm - Castle Rock, CO

I was quite late to start to regain - took me about 4 years, but I was really strict for those years. Got a bit lax and pow, 10lbs suddenly appeared.

Now, I'm fighting a slower metabolism with age so find that I need less calories to lose or maintain. Having said that, I am still able to lose - have dropped 14lb since January (late Covid/holiday chub).

There are very few people who never regain, most of us have to cut down now and again after modest regains. The difference is, we don't get to the stage we give up and end up regaining the lot, which is unfortunately very common.

Your nutritionist sounds like a saboteur - keep that in mind when she gives you advice

Proud Feminist, Atheist, LGBT friend, and Democratic Socialist

Alexpope
on 2/18/21 3:30 pm
RNY on 10/21/20

Kim seems like you have this all down and are killing it and I am going to take your advice. It is so funny you said this because I am not the only patient who has questioned her approach. Several of us have. So many that she has started to treat us like children who have to prove they are listening to her, she wants all of us to start documenting our daily meals/fluids and vitamins and present it each week at the support group - an accountability tool she said. However I missed the last meeting due to working overtime and some people who shared their daily log were chastised by her for eating too many calories, carbs or not getting enough fluids in. I totally get that she is to guide us but I don't think that is an effective way to get people to understand. It should be one on one or suggested but to have to prove you are listening to her is beyond belife. I plan on attending the next group session I will share my log and I am not altering it to fit her views. If she says one word I will stand up and tell her I am going to do it this way not hers. If my surgeon fires me oh well. I can use this site for support and guidance.

hollykim
on 2/12/21 3:27 am - Nashville, TN
Revision on 03/18/15
On February 10, 2021 at 7:06 PM Pacific Time, Alexpope wrote:

I just hit my fourth post op month and all I can say is wow. So many things have changed since surgery all for the good. Especially the fact I am now down 100bs. But the girl who handles nutrition at my program told me I am losing too much too quickly and told me to increase my calories and I am just not comfortable with that. I have much more to lose and I really think her advice is a bit off considering that I will hit a point where I won't lose anymore. Does anyone else see an issue with her advice to increase calories?

I absolutely agree with Kim. Lose all you can as quickly as you can.

listen to what the nutritionist says, then go home and keep on doing what you have been doing because you are being successful.
many "nutritionists" do t have a clue about how to advise WLS patients.

 


          

 

Janet P.
on 2/15/21 8:16 am

Personally I think what's more important is changing your eating habits (forever). As long as you're aware of what you're eating and how it affects your long-term goals, you should continue on your path. Make sure you're staying healthy (will they do 6-month labs) then keep up the good work!!

Janet in Leesburg
DS 2/25/03
Hazem Elariny
-175

Lauren010110
on 2/15/21 10:50 am - Victorville, CA

Keep a food log of everything you are consuming. Follow the guidelines given to you by your surgeon. As long as you are following those, I think you should be good. Yes, by typical (NON WLS) standards, you are loosing weight "too" quickly... but that is the point, to get weight off ASAP and as the other posters stated, to work on creating healthier habits going forward. I have several friends who, during the honeymoon stage still ate crap and lost weight. They didn't learn the habits that would help them succeed when they could no longer RELY on the procedure. Many have gained their weight back and are struggling. There will become a time when your body will adjust to your New Norm and hold on to EVERYTHING you eat and regain will be easy.

Keep your protein goals up, liquid intake high and carb/sugar count down. You've got the right mindset!

H.A.L.A B.
on 2/16/21 2:47 pm

As long a you getting enough proteins, and vitamins and minerals, plus some healthy fats - do as fast as you want to do it.

Just don't turn obsessive into anorexia. Some of us post op try really hard and end up with other issues.

Counseling may be a god idea.

BTW: I've seen a lot of people who added foods that some of us, long term post op WLS think that people shouldn't eat while in the honeymoon phase, as they are losing weight, and a lot f them ended not getting into the goal until they change the attitude. A bite here, a bite therem and next thing- they are craving more carbs and sugars.

We need to get essential proteins in, IMPO- 100 gr per day, unless someone's blood work show they have high normal proteins, then minerals and vitamins, and some essential fats. (nt a lot of fats since we re trying to use the fats we carry around)

Hala. RNY 5/14/2008; Happy At Goal =HAG

"I can eat or do anything I want to - as long as I am willing to deal with the consequences"

"Failure is not falling down, It is not getting up once you fell... So pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again...."

White Dove
on 2/17/21 5:45 am

RNY has a bounceback period where you regain no matter how strict you are being. It happened to me in year three and I went from 128 to 142 in less than three months. Then I joined Weigh****chers again. The rest of my life has been a struggle to fight regain.

It is too bad that the person you are seeing does not understand how RNY works. You have a honeymoon to lose the weight and you need to lose every ounce you can during that honeymoon. The bounceback period lasts the rest of your life.

After your body heals completely from RNY you can gain much quicker than before surgery. For me it is a lot more work and a lot fewer calories to lose regain. If you are confident enough to stand up for yourself, you can continue to see that person and end up educating her so she might have some value to give to future weight loss patients.

The most important thing you can do to get to goal quickly is eliminate white carbs. Rice, fruit, potatoes, bread, sugar, flour, cake, cookies, candy, and sugary drinks will all sabotage you by bringing back cravings and hunger. Consume protein, non-starchy vegetables, and lots of water.

Lose as quickly as possible. Take advantage of the surgery. You have a once in a lifetime opportunity. Revisions do not work.

Real life begins where your comfort zone ends

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