Why did you choose this procedure over Lap Band, Bypass and Sleeve?

HaleyyGirl
on 9/30/20 10:40 am

New here and curious as to why you chose this procedure over the others? Looking for positive and negative experiences.

Janet P.
on 10/1/20 6:53 am

I had a large amount of weight to lose and I didn't want to "fail". I was originally looking at the RNY because a co-worker got it (this is back in 2002) and seemed to be doing well - she lost 100 pounds. She unfortunately never changed her eating habits and ultimately gained back all her lost weight (and then some). That wasn't going to happen to me.

When I started researching and heard about the DS I knew that this was the right surgery for me. I was a "gorger" meaning I tended to eat the majority of my food at "meals" which could be 2-3 times more than the average person. But of course I also grazed. Based on that and the success of the DS long term, I made the commitment, because IMHO that's what the DS (or really any other WLS) is. Making a commitment to yourself to follow the rules to take full advantage of this new tool I was given. I did my research and I have never looked back. I was also incredibly lucky to have one of the premiere DS surgeons in the country right in my neighborhood.

I have experienced some issues over the years primarily with iron deficiency anemia (controlled with infusions) and I've developed osteoporosis (trying to find the right treatment). But I'm still at my goal weight after more than 17 years. I love food and enjoy it more now than I did pre-op.

The DS is a lifetime commitment - to eating right, to taking vitamins, to getting your labs done regularly, to staying healthy. If you're not willing to make that commitment, then the DS isn't for you.

Do your research. Make sure your surgeon is skilled at the DS. Many surgeons either don't have the skills for the DS or are reluctant to do the procedure (see paragraph above) - it's the commitment thing.

Janet in Leesburg
DS 2/25/03
Hazem Elariny
-175

HaleyyGirl
on 10/1/20 3:38 pm

WOW, THANK YOU for sharing. I am similar and feel like i can eat way too much and out eat any one in my circle. And, that is definitely not something to brag about.

Seems like there are some that have the surgery and who don't change tend to be back where they started. Seems like a conundrum to enjoy food more so now, after surgery and still be so successful. Part of me is afraid, I guess!

There are a few I have come across that are over 15 years post-op and I appreciate you all for giving this newbie a sence of relief with asking such trivial questions

Janet P.
on 10/2/20 4:44 am, edited 10/1/20 9:44 pm

Every surgery requires a change in habits. For me it was learning about food - reading labels, understanding exactly what I was putting in my body. I had a tough surgery and was in the hospital for 3 days. I felt that because I risked my life to just have the surgery I wasn't going to screw it up and I was going to do everything in my power to make sure I was successful. It's truly a lifetime commitment (IMO).

I eat quite a bit now. My stomach is definitely stretched (obviously not to pre-op size). I feel that I eat what a "normal" person eats (maybe sometimes a little more). What keeps me at my goal weight at 17 years post-op is the malabsorption, period. In my head I track the amount of protein I eat (making sure I get a minimum of 100 grams of protein per day). Carbs are a different story. I have learned over the years how my system reacts to certain foods so I pay attention to that. I basically eat what I want (as long as I've gotten in my protein and water), but the difference is everything is in moderation. If I want ice cream, I have some - a pint will last me three-four servings. I eat salads (with added protein). The only thing I measure anymore is pasta - I weight it out before I cook it.

I also know my DS still works - if I notice the scale is going up a little, I simply cut back on carbs and the extra few pounds are gone. I had gotten as high as 165 (honestly I weigh myself every morning and I can also tell by my clothes). When I saw 165 I freaked a little and went back to basics. This morning I was 147.5 - which honestly is too low. I can always tell simply by what I ate the day before. I sometimes feel I eat constantly. I can eat breakfast at 6AM and by 9AM I'm hungry and will have something to tide me over to lunch ;). I tend to snack all day.

Janet in Leesburg
DS 2/25/03
Hazem Elariny
-175

HaleyyGirl
on 10/2/20 3:29 pm

What was your starting weight, if I may ask? I am seeing a trend with the 15-20 year post ops and all of you have a plethora of information to share, so forgive me if I poke for a bit more! is the standard grams of protein 100 for everyone? ow do you feel when you eat carbs?d

Janet P.
on 10/3/20 7:50 am

My surgery weight was about 320 (I'm 5'3"). I was 45 when I had my surgery. It took me about 16 months to reach my goal weight (150) and this morning my weight was 149. I did have plastic surgery about 3 years post-op - I had a breast lift and a tummy tuck (TT was paid for by insurance).

Protein is personal. At the start the general rule of thumb was 30 grams of protein by 30-days post-op 60 grams by 60 days, and ultimately 90 grams by 90 days post-op. When I was in my weight loss phase and working out (I worked out anywhere from 3-4 times a week once my surgeon cleared me) I would aim for at least 125 grams of protein. Now I always exceed 100 grams of protein - my goal is always a minimum of 25 grams of protein per meal. I also snack on protein which gets more >100.

Carbs give me gas and bloating, period. Some carbs are easier to eat than others. High fiber foods also don't work for me. I try to get more complex carbs in (complex carbs are natural carbs - potatoes, veggies, etc.). I do eat simple carbs - bread, sweets, etc. No idea how many carbs I eat. Carbs are what makes me lose or gain weight. If I notice the scale creeping up, I simply cut back on the simple carbs. It has worked for me.

Make the commitment to change everything - your eating habits (don't ever say you're on a diet), how you look at food (I love food - cooking it and eating it), how food affects your body. Read labels - learn what you're eating. I tend to eat more organic foods - I shop at the local farmers market.

Janet in Leesburg
DS 2/25/03
Hazem Elariny
-175

smmrtyme1225
on 10/11/20 6:56 pm - Lake Hamilton, FL

Newbie here too!

HaleyyGirl
on 10/23/20 10:49 am

You and I are learning together, then!

smmrtyme1225
on 10/11/20 6:54 pm - Lake Hamilton, FL

Hi Janet, my initial WLS consult, my Dr also suggested DS based on my emotional eating and being a grazer. I was going in thinking I was on track for sleeve. I am still a little freaked at the change, as most of my research was for the sleeve. This is the first experience I've heard for such a long time post op. Just curious, you said a great surgeon was close by and I think it says your from Leesburg. Can you supply the name of your surgeon? My surgeon is Dr Teixiera out of Orlando Regional.

hollykim
on 10/1/20 2:37 pm - Nashville, TN
Revision on 03/18/15
On September 30, 2020 at 5:40 PM Pacific Time, HaleyyGirl wrote:

New here and curious as to why you chose this procedure over the others? Looking for positive and negative experiences.

I would never consider the lap band and hope you research that well. Too too TOO many ppl have had terrible experiences with it and many insurers are going to one bariatric surgery per lifetime.

many have developed irreversible complications from the band. It was originally designed to only stay in for 10 years , not a lifetime. Many surgeons refuse to even do them anymore.

 


          

 

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