Have ya'll heard of this before?

Karen H.
on 11/16/15 1:21 pm
VSG on 12/08/14

I am 11 months post op and have almost reached my goal, 8 lbs to go! I went to my sleep doctor to check to see if I still have sleep  apnea since I have lost 97 lbs. I did the at home test twice and both times showing I have mild sleep apnea. My oxygen level was normal but it still shows signs of sleep apnea and was told I will need to continue with the cpap machine for the rest of my life! UGH!! I was told if I did not use it, I could gain all my weight back! Have ya'll heard of this before? I have been at a weight stall for about 7 weeks now and have not used my machine during that period of time. I was told not using the machine could keep me from losing more weight. Have ya'll heard of this before? I am going back on the darn machine tonight. I was told if I didn't use it, I could get heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and possibly gain all the weight back. Just wondering if ya'll have heard of this before? I guess I will never be rid of the cpap! :(

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                

Tracy D.
on 11/16/15 1:24 pm, edited 11/16/15 5:23 am - Papillion, NE
VSG on 05/24/13

I have heard that getting off the CPAP is extremely difficult and sometimes impossible post-op.  It can happen but it doesn't happen for everybody.  And yes, I've heard that not getting good quality sleep can lead to weight gain and all those other health problems you talked about.  

I would get back on the CPAP machine in a heart beat, especially if I thought for a second it would help me to maintain my weight!  

 Tracy  5'3"     HW: 235  SW: 218  CW: 132    M1: -22  M2: -13  M3: -12  M4: -9  M5: -8   M6: -10   M7: -4

 Goal reached in 7 months and 1 week

 Lower Body Lift w/Dr. Barnthouse 7-8-15

   

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

Karen H.
on 11/16/15 2:41 pm
VSG on 12/08/14

Tracy, thank you so much for your input. I am definitely getting back on the CPAP starting tonight. :) I just got a wake up call from the sleep doctor today, scared me. I surely don't want to gain back my weight!! Tracy, I wanted to tell you that I noticed your stats and you are close to where I am... I am 5'4'' and started at 240 and now 11 months out, I am at 143. I have been at a 7 week stall, probably due to not using the CPAP. But, I am so impressed to "your" weight loss!! How old are you? I am 58 1/2. How did you lose so quickly and consistently? SO IMPRESSED!!! :) You are at the weight I am wanting to get down to. (130's) Got any advice for me? :) Thanks again for your input. I never knew not using the CPAP could cause weight gain, though it does make sense now. :)

 

 

Tracy D.
on 11/16/15 4:00 pm - Papillion, NE
VSG on 05/24/13

I was 51 when I got the surgery. I started at 218 lbs the day of surgery. I stuck strictly to the 80 g of protein, 40 g of carb or less and 100 ounces of water per day.  I did some exercise but nothing super intense or crazy at all. It definitely gets much much slower at the end. 

 Tracy  5'3"     HW: 235  SW: 218  CW: 132    M1: -22  M2: -13  M3: -12  M4: -9  M5: -8   M6: -10   M7: -4

 Goal reached in 7 months and 1 week

 Lower Body Lift w/Dr. Barnthouse 7-8-15

   

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

cmcelfish
on 11/16/15 6:37 pm

I don't know if all machines are the same mine has a computer chipmin it every time I go to the lung doctor I have to take the chip. The chip letsvthem know how many hours I use it how many days I use it a % of required time I used it and then pressure the machine was using. They even give me a print out of the results likecacreport card

Karen H.
on 11/16/15 3:10 pm
VSG on 12/08/14

Just wanted to add this to my post..... I thought when I got all my weight off I would be rid of sleep apnea. 

I was told that 65% of bariatric patients do get rid of sleep apnea after their weight loss but the other 35% have it

for the rest of their lives! (hereditary thing) That's where I fell in at.... the 35% ! So discouraging but it is what it is, I guess. 

 

 

                                

cmcelfish
on 11/16/15 4:18 pm

My sleep doctor says sleep apnea  uncontrolled no using cpap can because weigh gain. Not sleeping speaking up when you stop breathing causes stress on body the damage may be done with sleep atnea. If I loose my weigh I will be glad to use my cpap

animallover1247
on 11/16/15 5:12 pm

Yep, all the above posts are correct. Having sleep apnea affects many things, including gaining weight and not be able to lose weight. It's crazy, I know. My pulmunologist  said he fully expects my sleep apnea to resolve completely but I will need to lose at least 50-100 lbs. Also, keep in mind there are people who are not overweight who have sleep apnea. 

(deactivated member)
on 11/17/15 10:44 am
RNY on 05/04/15

Not only does untreated sleep apnea sap your energy, but it actually affects your production of the hormones leptin and ghrelin, leading to altered metabolism, insulin resistance, and increased hunger. For a lot of people, sleep apnea is weight related. But I run sleep studies for a living, and I've seen horrible apnea in 90 lb. 16-year-old girls too. Sometimes it just comes down to airway anatomy.

Your doc is absolutely right about heart disease and high blood pressure, too. Every time you stop breathing in your sleep, your brain and body are essentially suffocating. Your oxygen levels often drop, but even if they don't, your body senses an immediate threat, so your sympathetic nervous system (the "fight or flight" response) kicks into high gear, spiking your blood pressure and heart rate and waking you up to take a few recovery breaths. Not only do those awakenings impact your sleep quality, but the wide swings in heart rate and BP throughout the night put major stress on your heart.

I regularly give talks to patients in cardiac rehab programs about the importance of identifying and treating sleep apnea for their heart health and recoveries, but if there's one thing I regret, it's knowing that some of them undoubtedly could have avoided their heart attacks or heart failure altogether with earlier intervention regarding their sleep.

Karen H.
on 11/17/15 4:07 pm
VSG on 12/08/14

Thank you for this information. I have started back on my CPAP machine. You have been so helpful! :)

                                

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